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Tag: kielder osprey chicks

Kielder Northumberland osprey chicks say ‘There’s no place like home’!

Kielder Northumberland osprey chicks say ‘There’s no place like home’!

Other posts by  |  Sheelagh Caygill on Google+ |  August 28, 2012 | 0 Comments

The Kielder Forest osprey chicks on nest number two continue to grow and develop their hunting skills. They were spotted this weekend hanging out on the home nest, enjoying some fish.

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Final two Kielder Northumbrian osprey chicks take to the skies

Final two Kielder Northumbrian osprey chicks take to the skies

Other posts by  |  Sheelagh Caygill on Google+ |  August 1, 2012 | 0 Comments

Expert Osprey watchers at Kielder were thrilled this week when the final two osprey chicks born at Kielder this year took to the skies – after bouncing on the nest for some time. The birds did well and seemed to enjoy soaring journey into the skies above the forest.

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Kielder osprey chicks experience tragedy and drama in Northumbria

Kielder osprey chicks experience tragedy and drama in Northumbria

Other posts by  |  Sheelagh Caygill on Google+ |  June 21, 2012 | 0 Comments

It has been a roller-coaster of a week for people watching and interested in the Kielder osprey chicks, with the loss of two chicks, and fears for another, which re-emerged safely this week. A third, smaller chick was fighting for survival but is now holding its own, gaining weight and competing for food.

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First osprey chicks born at Kielder Northumberland this year

First osprey chicks born at Kielder Northumberland this year

Other posts by  |  Sheelagh Caygill on Google+ |  May 29, 2012 | 0 Comments

The first osprey chick of 2012 hatched at Kieler on Saturday, with a second emerging on Monday. They were born in one of the two osprey nests in the 62,000 hectare (155,000 acre) Northumbrian wilderness. Kielder Forest in the North of England is one of the few locations where the bird has naturally recolonised after becoming extinct in the 19th century.

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