Accommodation Search for Northumberland and Scottish Borders
banner ad
Ford and Etal

Flodden 1513

Flodden Monument

Flodden Monument

 Flodden 1513

The Battle of Flodden was a complex, political, and bloody battle fought right on the Border of England and Scotland on 9th September 1513.

It was the last time a monarch of the British Isles was killed on the battlefield, had a level of slaughter the equivalent to the first hour of the Battle of the Somme, and cemented the course of British and European politics and power for future generations.

The Battle, which took place in a now rural and peaceful part of the Northumberland countryside, was a decisive moment in British History, and is protected, and remembered, through the Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum.

The Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum is a “museum without walls” that links together significant places which relate to the Battle of Flodden.  These places range from things such as lovely pure-stone churches, large single-span bridges, old working Mills, and emotive monuments, as well as the eerie Battlefield itself.  The Ecomuseum also includes the intangible aspects of the Flodden heritage, ranging from Sir Walter Scott’s poem Marmion to the renowned pipe tune The Flowers o’ the Forest.

The Ecomuseum connects the cultures, communities and shared heritage relating to Flodden and acts as a focal point to promote community events relating to this heritage.

And, the 500th anniversary of this major Battle in 2013 has sprouted a number of commemorative events organised by many different community groups and individuals though out the Borderlands and beyond.

Added to this, there is a four-year Heritage Lottery Funded project on-going from 2013 to 2017, which includes Archaeology digs, Documentary Research, and Education Programmes.

Please visit www.flodden1513.com to read more about Flodden  events planned in 2013, to learn more about the creation of the UK’s first cross-border ecomuseum, and to find out about the four-year HLF-funded Flodden Project.

The village of Branxton seen from Flodden Field, shutterstock

The village of Branxton seen from Flodden Field, shutterstock